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    Galeria Jaqueline Martins is pleased to present INCOMPLETE… a group exhibition inspired by the recent conversation between Robert Barry and Ricardo Basbaum, arranged as part of our online Interview Program. The show features works by Ana Mazzei, Charbel Joseph H. Boutros, Lydia Okumura, Philippe Van Snick, Regina Vater, Ricardo Basbaum and Robert Barry. INCOMPLETE borrows its title from a work specifically developed by Robert Barry for his 2019 solo show at Galeria Jaqueline Martins in São Paulo.
     
    The exhibition highlights a selection of works who in the individuality of their expression testify to the wide range of media and styles that reaffirm the importance of imagination, speculation and public participation in the construction and the incorporation of subjects that permeate contemporary works of art. INCOMPLETE showcases artists from different generations and, in collaboration with the Philippe van Snick Estate, draw the first connections among a Belgium artist and the gallery program.
     
     
  • Robert Barry, Untitled (1988)

    Robert Barry

    Untitled (1988)

    Robert Barry (1936) is, since the 1960’s, one of the most important names in North-American conceptual art.  In 1969 (after a highly experimental period in which the artist worked with gas, and even radiation) Barry begun to incorporate texts into his installations, aiming to connect more directly with the observer and to create a dynamic in which every though or reaction coming from the public in relation to the artist choices would became part of the work. Throughout the 1980s, words no longer occupy only windows and exhibition walls and return to his paintings. Untitled is part of this production - where a painting (a medium still seen today as the epitome of the artist's expressive singularity) can also have an almost industrial, clean and precise appearance, where its significance stems not from the expressiveness brought by the brush gestures, but from its ability to exercise direct communication between artist and observers.

     

  • "I have to say something. The things that are most powerful, that affect us and influence us the most... what we don't understand, the things that affect us most deeply in our lives... are all invisible. I think that there are things, energies, thoughts among us, that involve us and that we don't fully understand. In my work, I try to use some of that"

     

    Robert Barry

    • Robert Barry Untitled, 1988 57 x 57 cm unique
      Robert Barry
      Untitled, 1988
      57 x 57 cm
      unique
    • Robert Barry Untitled, 2019 42 x 29.7 cm Edition of 100
      Robert Barry
      Untitled, 2019
      42 x 29.7 cm
      Edition of 100
    • Robert Barry Untitled, 2018 30.5 x 30.5 cm (cada/each) unique
      Robert Barry
      Untitled, 2018
      30.5 x 30.5 cm (cada/each)
      unique
  • Regina Vater, From the series “Desenhos sensuais”, 1976/1979

    Regina Vater

    Desenhos sensuais (1976/1979)

    In a research that encompasses the relationship between society, nature and technology, Regina Vater (1943) has developed a complex and sophisticated body of work over the last five decades that contributes significantly to the debate on the emergence of a media ecology in the areas of art and contemporary life. The poetic, activist and ecological nature of his work has always been woven into trans-media impulses, where the language of each work presents itself as a further development of the artist interests. The series Desenhos sensuais (Sensual drawings) present small exercises in which Regina explores the ambiguity provided by the line. The simplicity of the compositions opens space in the imagination of the observer, who, influenced by the title of the series, inevitably questions what else these lines could reveal or hide.

     

    • Regina Vater From the series “Desenhos sensuais”, 1976/1979 54.5 x 55.5 (framed) 14.6 x 15.4 cm (drawing) unique
      Regina Vater
      From the series “Desenhos sensuais”, 1976/1979
      54.5 x 55.5 (framed)
      14.6 x 15.4 cm (drawing)
      unique
    • Regina Vater From the series “Desenhos sensuais”, 1976/1979 54.5 x 55.5 cm (framed) 13,1 x 16 cm (drawing) unique
      Regina Vater
      From the series “Desenhos sensuais”, 1976/1979
      54.5 x 55.5 cm (framed)
      13,1 x 16 cm (drawing)
      unique
  • "It is not in my style to do antiseptic works. In fact, one thing I don't have is style. My curiosity and appetite for experimenting led me to use various media. NOT for simple formal exercise or attempts at extravagance, but because they are, in their forms or essences, the most appropriate for the generation of a visual discourse that I propose at a given moment. When the wave is born in the brain, it is endowed with; and here I dare to quote Homer stealing his expression: PLURI FINGERS - fertilizers, eager for expression"

     

    Regina Vater

    • Regina Vater Mulher, mulher, mulher, 1966 29 x 38 cm unique
      Regina Vater
      Mulher, mulher, mulher, 1966
      29 x 38 cm
      unique
    • Regina Vater Quem provoca a cicatriz em você! Quem provoca a cicatriz em mim?, 1977 26 x 240 x 5 cm 2/3
      Regina Vater
      Quem provoca a cicatriz em você! Quem provoca a cicatriz em mim?, 1977
      26 x 240 x 5 cm
      2/3
  • Charbel-joseph H. Boutros, ..., 2016

    Charbel-joseph H. Boutros

    ... (2016)

    Sculptures and installations produced by Charbel-joseph H. Boutros (1981) are charged with gestures and actions that, although not visible to the public, demonstrate deep intimate, geographical and historical layers, reverberating beyond existing physical and temporal realities. The work (...) represents a part of his research focused in the relationship between the public, art institutions and the expectations and "beliefs" that permeate it. The plastered shape we see in the wall is a framed map of the last exhibition held in the gallery, now buried and hidden. Although the public did not see the action and cannot be sure of what it really hides, they have to believe the artist discourse. 

     

     

    • Charbel-joseph H. Boutros Lovers, 2011 1.5 x 28 x 1 cm 2/3 + 2 A.P.
      Charbel-joseph H. Boutros
      Lovers, 2011
      1.5 x 28 x 1 cm
      2/3 + 2 A.P.
  • "A chat with Charbel-joseph H. Boutros can move in many different directions, in quick and precise movements: geography and pop noir (80's), romanticism and geopolitics, architecture and colonialism, sensitivity and calculation, conceptualism and melancholy, disaster and nature touch each other and move away, in a discourse where irony becomes the engine for thought"
     
    Marcelo Rezende, curator
    • Charbel-joseph H. Boutros Untitled until now, 2019 39.5 x 9 x 4 cm unique
      Charbel-joseph H. Boutros
      Untitled until now, 2019
      39.5 x 9 x 4 cm
      unique
    • Charbel-joseph H. Boutros Vanitas vanitatum omnia vanitas, 2012 3 x 20 cm 1/3 + 2 A.P.
      Charbel-joseph H. Boutros
      Vanitas vanitatum omnia vanitas, 2012
      3 x 20 cm
      1/3 + 2 A.P.
  • Lydia Okumura, The Appearance, 1975

    Lydia Okumura

    The Appearance (1975)

    First impressions of Lydia Okumura’s (1948) individual work can easily be misleading. For almost 50 years, the Brazilian-born, New York based artist has been investigating the interstice between two and three-dimensional space through precise, site-specific installations. Although her practice can be framed within the minimalist tradition, op art is also at play. Through modest interventions, Okumura enhances our awareness of our bodily presence in the exhibition space. The Appearance is part of a series of installations in which the artist uses only elastic cords and graphite lines drawn directly on the walls, with no addition of colors or new volumes. Through this gesture, discreet but ambitious, the artist allows the observer to have an even greater role in interacting with the work.

     

    • Lydia Okumura The Appearence, NY, 1976 217 x 427 x 77 cm 2/4 + 1 A.P. + 1 E.C.
      Lydia Okumura
      The Appearence, NY, 1976
      217 x 427 x 77 cm
      2/4 + 1 A.P. + 1 E.C.
    • Lydia Okumura Três quadrados coloridos, 1984 34 x 41 x 47 cm 1/3 + 1 A.P.
      Lydia Okumura
      Três quadrados coloridos, 1984
      34 x 41 x 47 cm
      1/3 + 1 A.P.
    • Lydia Okumura PS1, New York, 1981 200 x 313 x 141 cm 1/3 + 1 A.P + 1 E.C
      Lydia Okumura
      PS1, New York, 1981
      200 x 313 x 141 cm
      1/3 + 1 A.P + 1 E.C
  • “The installations I had been creating were for the most part based on elements of the architecture inside the exhibition space. I would build virtual structures going through walls, the ceiling and the floor, sliding back and forth between two and three dimensions. In a way, the subject matter of my work has always been the viewers themselves. Walking across the space, they would begin to reflect about themselves”

     

    Lydia Okumura

    • Lydia Okumura Sem título, FAAP, 1971-72 35 x 48 x 65 cm 1/3 + 1 A.
      Lydia Okumura
      Sem título, FAAP, 1971-72
      35 x 48 x 65 cm
      1/3 + 1 A.
  • EXHIBITION VIEWS
  • Philippe Van Snick, Cut leaf, Black bamboo leaf, Cut leaves, 1975

    Philippe Van Snick

    Cut leaf, Black bamboo leaf, Cut leaves (1975)

    The oeuvre of Philippe Van Snick (1946-2019) is complex as well as simple, dense as well as transparent, concrete as well as abstract. This artist work cannot be subsumed in a single category, and at the same time it is lucid and disciplined throughout. By ascetically holding on to a strict ‘alphabet’ of ten colours and ten numbers (0-9), Van Snick has developed a mode of creativity that continues to renew itself all the time, despite his self-imposed restrictions, if not rather because of them. At first sight, his artistic language seems formal and distanced, but on closer inspection it gives way to a poetry that links up everyday experience with universal concerns. His conceptual austerity marks out an unpredictable and adventurous trajectory in the diversity of media in which his artistic works have taken shape. 

    • Philippe Van Snick Monochrome Désatabilisé-re, 1980 400 x 280 cm unique
      Philippe Van Snick
      Monochrome Désatabilisé-re, 1980
      400 x 280 cm
      unique
  • “My work starts from concrete experience, from things that offer themselves to me in everyday life.

    Whenever I am pondering an idea, an object I run into may suddenly help me to do the next move”

     

    Philippe Van Snick

    • Philippe Van Snick Spring (8), 2018 59.4 x 84.1 cm unique
      Philippe Van Snick
      Spring (8), 2018
      59.4 x 84.1 cm
      unique
  • Ana Mazzei, Bode, 2019

    Ana Mazzei

    Bode (2019)

    To Ana Mazzei (1980), art, architecture and landscapes construct, in themselves, a fiction that connects them, resulting in installations, settings and objects. Beyond the formalist exercises, her sculpture and installations - of which Bode is one of the more recent examples - invoke unidentified stories that suggest hidden and impenetrable archetypal structures. They present themselves as pieces and fragments of myths, lives and tales, and are assembled directly on the floor, confronting the observer's own scale.

     

    • Ana Mazzei Estudos para Fantasmas/Lençol, 2017 63 x 71 cm unique
      Ana Mazzei
      Estudos para Fantasmas/Lençol, 2017
      63 x 71 cm
      unique
    • Ana Mazzei Romana, 2020 110 x 112 cm unique
      Ana Mazzei
      Romana, 2020
      110 x 112 cm
      unique
  • “Regardless of the things I would choose to create, my practice is focused on trying to understand something about representation, space and people. From the beginning, I was somehow aware of this, but perhaps because I was not worried about finding a “theme” for what I was doing, for some time I could not understand exactly what would bring all those things that interested me so much. I try to organize my imaginative (imaginary) world as if it were a diorama organizing architecture and objects”

     

    Ana Mazzei

    • Ana Mazzei Ghosts, 2017 176 x 283 x 124 cm unique
      Ana Mazzei
      Ghosts, 2017
      176 x 283 x 124 cm
      unique
  • Ricardo Basbaum, Olho, 1984

    Ricardo Basbaum

    Olho/Eye (1980's)

    First presented in the seminal exhibition How do you do, 80’s Generation? (Parque Lage, Rio de Janeiro, 1984), the EYE symbol was printed in stickers by Ricardo Basbaum (São Paulo, 1961), scattered throughout the exhibition space and  also available for sale: a way to extend the work beyond the event.

     

    Subsequently, the symbol also appeared in drawings, paintings and urban interventions. Olho displays the symbol in a regular matchbox. Besides producing an effect of demarcation and anthropomorphizing of objects and images, the EYE symbol provokes a perceptive reversibility, making objects, now transformed into agents and pulled out of their indifference, observe us.

    • Ricardo Basbaum Sem título, 1987-1988 28 x 35.5 cm (framed) unique
      Ricardo Basbaum
      Sem título, 1987-1988
      28 x 35.5 cm (framed)
      unique
      Sold
    • Ricardo Basbaum Sem título, 1987-1988 28 x 35.5 cm (framed) unique
      Ricardo Basbaum
      Sem título, 1987-1988
      28 x 35.5 cm (framed)
      unique
      Sold
  • “Having lived the 1980s, at a time when the market was growing in a very aggressive way, I developed a certain resistance to these mechanisms. Although I think the market is a space you should always try to occupy - since there’s no precise line indicating where it ends and where it starts - at the same time I was developing a practice that protected me a little from certain commercial mechanisms that seemed very simplistic, very summary"

     

    Ricardo Basbaum

    • Ricardo Basbaum Olho, 1985 157 x 243 cm unique
      Ricardo Basbaum
      Olho, 1985
      157 x 243 cm
      unique
  •  

     


     

     

  • Interview Program I

    Robert Barry & Ricardo Basbaum (25.03.2021)

    Interview Program is a new cycle of online activities conceived by Galeria Jaqueline Martins. In each edition, two artists develop a free dialogue, with no pre-established guidelines or limitations. The first edition, presented live on March 25, Robert Barry  developed a dialogue with Ricardo Basbaum. Although they come from different contexts, countries and generations, both artists have become known for presenting works that articulate sensorial experiences, socia-bility and language. While Robert Barry came to such proposals through the develop-ment of North American conceptual art – where the use of texts and words sought to bring the work into the mind of the observer – Ricardo Basbaum, on the other hand, resumed the participa-tory experiences of the 60s and brought to a post-dictatorship Brazil of the 80s and 90s the freedom to again be able to ask, without censorship, “would you like to participate in an artistic experience?”.

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